Irvine’s Weekly EQ Workout

Last I had the pleasure of experiencing the keynote speech of Candice Mama from South Africa. In it she tells the spellbinding story of how she was moved to forgive the man who murdered her father. The human capacity to forgive even the deepest wrongs is truly awe-inspiring.
For those experiencing sorrow, whether, through death, separation, divorce, illness, job loss, or relocation, the glittering commercialism and unrelenting cheer of the holiday season can be stressful.
For those experiencing sorrow, whether, through death, separation, divorce, illness, job loss, or relocation, the glittering commercialism and unrelenting cheer of the holiday season can be stressful.
For those experiencing sorrow, whether, through death, separation, divorce, illness, job loss, or relocation, the glittering commercialism and unrelenting cheer of the holiday season can be stressful.
This past week in the USA we celebrated Thanksgiving. For many, it is a day for family and friends to connect, pause, and be grateful.
I recently came across a survey with a focus on how employees were feeling about their present positions. One of the findings jumped out at me.
In today’s world, “white noise” suffuses our office buildings; music, news, and sports broadcast in public places morning to night; leaf blowers scream; cell phones track us down with their insistent rings.
I like to say that we all have a conflict story. For most of us, our experience of conflict in our lives shapes how we cope and manage present conflict.
If there is one thing that we can take for granted these days, it is the reality of change.
Do you work hard but feel like you’ve accomplished little or nothing at the end of the day?
We make decisions every day. While simple decisions require a fairly straightforward decision-making process, complex decisions usually require more effort to properly deal with challenges such as uncertainty, risk, alternatives, and consequences.
Have you ever heard of the phrase "I put my foot in my mouth"? It normally describes situations when you say or do something that you should not have and ends up embarrassing someone else or yourself.
As long as there has been something to write on, humans have been keeping journals.
A few weeks ago, I had a training engagement with a client. The topic was emotional intelligence, and I had everything prepared.
“The arrival of a good clown into a village does more for its health than 20 asses laden with drugs,” observed Thomas Sydenham, a seventeenth-century British physician, who may have been the first doctor to recommend laughter as the best medicine.
Recently, a friend suggested that I watch a new television series on HBO called The White Orchid. It’s a drama series set in a resort in Hawaii.